Muscle Imbalances and Scoliosis - OsteoPilates

Muscle Imbalances and Scoliosis

Muscle imbalances and scoliosis go hand-in-hand. For scoliosis, exercise often aims at making tight muscles more flexible and weak muscles stronger. However, this approach is simplistic and does not take into account the complexity of the changes that occur with scoliosis.

Muscle Imbalances and Scoliosis

Muscle Imbalances and Scoliosis

 

The study presented here is a collection of data from all Authorized Scolio-Pilates Practitioners working with 4-curve scoliosis clients and patients. Each practitioner has been assigned the task of finding a pattern of muscle imbalances and scoliosis.

TASK: To identify a predictable pattern of tight to weak muscles in 4-Curve Scoliosis.

Introduction

Vladimr Janda (1928-2002) found muscle imbalances to be “systematic and predictable” due to the innate function of the sensori-motor system.  Janda further suggested a strong relationship between joint dysfunction and muscle imbalance (Source: Janda 1986a). He identified a predictable pattern of muscle tightness and weakness in his Upper and Lower Crossed Syndromes.janda upper crossed syndrome

In the image, the girl on the left shows a normal posture. The girl on the right shows Janda’s  “Upper Crossed Syndrome”. In this syndrome there is a predictable pattern of weak and tight muscles

Weak Tight
Scalenes Pectorals
Lower Trapezius Upper Trapezius

In Scoliosis, there also appears to be a predictable tight and weak muscle pattern. These predictable muscle pattern changes are concurrent with defined scoliosis skeletal patterns.  The defined skeletal pattern used for this study is a 4-Curve Scoliosis.

The 4-curve Scoliosis (Source: Schroth) pattern includes:

  1. Cervical curve with the convexity to the left.  Shoulder girdle glides left.
  2. Thoracic curve with the convexity to the right.
  3. Lumbar curve with the convexity to the left.
  4. Pelvic compensation with an L5-S1 change to the right and a coccyx that terminates pointing left.
Muscle Imbalances and Scoliosis, Scoliosis Syndrome: A Case Study in Progress by Karena Thek and the Authorized Scolio-Pilates Practitioners

Scoliosis Syndrome: A Case Study in Progress by Karena Thek and the Authorized Scolio-Pilates Practitioners

PURPOSE: To find if muscle imbalances and scoliosis create predictable patterns.

If a predictable muscle pattern is found then a specific method of management through exercise can be assigned.

Patterns of Muscle Imbalance found so far:

  • Green is Weak/Inhibited
  • Red is Tight/Facilitated

Within a typical 4-curve scoliosis, we have found the following  muscles imbalances.

We have found theses muscles to be generally inhibited:

Gluteus maximus – Left
Hamstrings – Left
Quadratus Lumborum – Right
Latissimus Doris – Right
Rhomboids – Right
Serratus Anterior – Left
Levator Scapula – Left

We have found theses muscles to be generally facilitated:

Gluteus maximus – Right
Hamstrings – Right
Quadratus Lumborum – Left
Latissimus Doris – Left
Rhomboids – Left
Serratus Anterior – Right
Levator Scapula – Right

Study continues on muscle imbalances and scoliosis to see if a predictable pattern of muscle imbalances occurs within certain predictable patterns of change associated with scoliosis.

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